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The news in this category has been selected by us because we thought it would be interestingto hard core cluster geeks. Of course, you don't have to be a cluster geek to read the news stories.

Somebody better be writing this down for the next crew

Cluster Documentation Project Remember when you said, I'll get to the documentation later and never did. Well, now it is later and it is time to get the documentation in better shape. After contributing to on-line cluster documentation for years, Cluster Monkey has decided to start a community based project to help make something that is good much better.

The state of HPC and cluster documentation is not bad per-se, but it needs work. Most projects have adequate documentation for experts and many academic text books have good in-depth background. There seems to be a hole however, in the "how-to" type of cluster documentation. In particular, it is often hard for newcomers to the community/market to get a foot hold in the HPC thing as it were. The open source nature of much of the software has created a wide ranging spectrum of resources and critical pathways. The Cluster Documentation Project (CDP) is designed to help improve this state of affairs. Leveraging some past efforts, the current project site has begun, but is far from being complete. For instance it has a unique listing of Open/Freely Available Cluster Applications not found anywhere else.

Hungry For Exascale ?

ImageIf you are attending SC11 and would like to a) eat a free breakfast, b) listen to experts answer questions and talk about exascale, c) try to win an ipad2 and, d) see what I actually look like in person, then please sign up for the Panasas and SICORP special event; The Road to Exascale Computing.

The event is sponsored by Panasas, the leader in high performance parallel storage, and SICORP, a Panasas Partner for implementing Panasas-based solutions. You are invited to a special breakfast event during SC11 where you can engage with industry luminaries who are on their way to making exascale computing a reality. Details below.

For the advanced students of HPC

Expect Intel to be making some noise about their MIC Architecture at SC11 this year. If you want to read the best summary to date (not by Intel) have a look at Greg Pfister's latest Perils of Parallel blog entry called MIC and the Knights.

While you are reading blogs, have a gander at some of the recent titles I have posted over at SICORP. Of course, you choose the topic that suits your mood or go for the grand prize and read them all*!

* full disclosure, the grand prize is an extra credit stamp on your HPC geek card.

It seems to me that we should talk about SC

ImageIf you attend SC11 you will have the opportunity to match wits in a game of Jeopardy!® with IBM's Watson computing system. Watson will be featured in a kiosk located on the 6th floor of the convention and trade center, separate from the main IBM booth. The kiosk is a version of the full IBM Power Systems-based Watson system that competed on the game show. Background on Watson can be found in our coverage of the three day Jeopardy match (day 1, day 2, day 3).

In other interesting news, the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin today announced that it will deploy and support a world-class supercomputer with comprehensive computing and visualization capabilities for the open science community, which seems standard enough, however, they will be using the Intel Intel® Many Integrated Core (MIC) processor to help achieve 10 petaflops of performance. The new system, called Stampede, will be built by TACC in partnership with Dell and Intel.

From the "fast compilers make me happy" department

PathScale announced today that the EKOPath 4 Compiler Suite is now available as an open source project and free download for Linux, FreeBSD and Solaris. This release includes documentation and the complete development stack, including compiler, debugger, assembler, runtimes and standard libraries. EKOPath is the product of years of ongoing development, representing one of the industries highest performance Intel 64 and AMD C, C++ and Fortran compilers. There do not seem to be any sources available just yet.

(Updated) For those that were wondering, EKOPath is a fully independent version and product. It shares a very distant past with the SGI Pro64 compiler and has evolved into a professional high performance compiler suite.

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