[Beowulf] bonding.txt really confusing, why don't I get higher aggregate bandwidth from multiple TCP connections from multiple gigabit clients with balance-alb bonding on a server?

Sabuj Pattanayek sabujp at gmail.com
Fri Feb 20 16:55:24 EST 2009


Hi,

I had posted this to the gentoo-cluster list, was told to look in the
archives here and after search for bonding and "balance-alb" in the
beowulf archives found no really clear answers regarding balance-alb
and multiple TCP connections. Furthermore bonding.txt is really
confusing, using terms interchangeably, so I'll post my question here
as well.

I've got the following system:

Linux server 2.6.26 #5 SMP Fri Feb 6 12:18:54 CST 2009 ppc64 PPC970FX,
altivec supported RackMac3,1 GNU/Linux

Setup on a cisco gig switch with both gigabit NICs in the following setup:

% cat /proc/net/bonding/bond0
Ethernet Channel Bonding Driver: v3.2.5 (March 21, 2008)

Bonding Mode: adaptive load balancing
Primary Slave: None
Currently Active Slave: eth0
MII Status: up
MII Polling Interval (ms): 100
Up Delay (ms): 0
Down Delay (ms): 0

Slave Interface: eth0
MII Status: up
Link Failure Count: 0
Permanent HW addr: 00:0d:93:9e:2b:ca

Slave Interface: eth1
MII Status: up
Link Failure Count: 0
Permanent HW addr: 00:0d:93:9e:2b:cb

Both eth0 and eth1 are running at 1000Mb/s full according to ethtool.
I start netserver (from netperf) on the server and then run netperf on
four other single gigabit connected clients on the same switch with:

netperf -l 45 -t TCP_STREAM -H server

but I get the following outputs:

client 1:

Recv   Send    Send
Socket Socket  Message  Elapsed
Size   Size    Size     Time     Throughput
bytes  bytes   bytes    secs.    10^6bits/sec

 87380  16384  16384    45.04     405.68

client 2:

Recv   Send    Send
Socket Socket  Message  Elapsed
Size   Size    Size     Time     Throughput
bytes  bytes   bytes    secs.    10^6bits/sec

 87380  16384  16384    45.01     216.07

client 3:

Recv   Send    Send
Socket Socket  Message  Elapsed
Size   Size    Size     Time     Throughput
bytes  bytes   bytes    secs.    10^6bits/sec

 87380  16384  16384    45.87     143.93

client 4:

Recv   Send    Send
Socket Socket  Message  Elapsed
Size   Size    Size     Time     Throughput
bytes  bytes   bytes    secs.    10^6bits/sec

 87380  16384  16384    45.05     164.05

adding those up gives me:

$ echo "405.68+216.07+143.93+164.05" | bc -l
929.73

Not more than 1gbps.

bonding.txt from the kernel docs says:

"balance-rr: This mode is the only mode that will permit a single
    TCP/IP connection to stripe traffic across multiple
    interfaces. It is therefore the only mode that will allow a
    single TCP/IP stream to utilize more than one interface's
    worth of throughput."

That much is understood, for a *single* TCP connection (or stream) I
can't get more than a single NIC's bandwidth unless I have balance-rr
enabled and LACP turned on in the switch. However:

"balance-tlb: The balance-tlb mode balances outgoing traffic by peer.
    Since the balancing is done according to MAC address, in a
    "gatewayed" configuration (as described above), this mode will
    send all traffic across a single device.  However, in a
    "local" network configuration, this mode balances multiple
    local network peers across devices in a vaguely intelligent
    manner (not a simple XOR as in balance-xor or 802.3ad mode),
    so that mathematically unlucky MAC addresses (i.e., ones that
    XOR to the same value) will not all "bunch up" on a single
    interface."

What I have is a "local" network configuration with a single switch
and multiple clients. Furthermore:

"balance-alb: This mode is everything that balance-tlb is, and more.
    It has all of the features (and restrictions) of balance-tlb,
    and will also balance incoming traffic from local network
    peers (as described in the Bonding Module Options section,
    above)."

So what that says to me is that with balance-alb the bonding driver
should "balance multiple local network peers across devices [NICs] in
a vaguely intelligent manner (not a simple XOR as in balance-xor or
802.3ad mode), so that mathematically unlucky MAC addresses (i.e.,
ones that XOR to the same value) will not all "bunch up" on a single
interface." similar to balance-tlb but for "incoming traffic from
local network peers" as well as outgoing.

But this is not what I'm seeing as in the test above. Shouldn't I be
able to get >> 1gbps with balance-alb mode from multiple TCP streams?
It looks like all the connections are bunching up on one interface. If
for whatever reason what I'm trying to do isn't possible unless I can
turn on LACP in the switch then what's the point of balance-alb or
balance-tlb? This seems like active-backup to me but with both NICs
enabled and sharing the load but at half capacity or something.

Thanks,
Sabuj Pattanayek
_______________________________________________
Beowulf mailing list, Beowulf at beowulf.org
To change your subscription (digest mode or unsubscribe) visit http://www.beowulf.org/mailman/listinfo/beowulf

-- 
This message has been scanned for viruses and
dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
believed to be clean.



More information about the Beowulf mailing list